Conductor
About

Bernard Labadie has established himself worldwide as one of the leading conductors of the Baroque and Classical repertoire, a reputation that is closely tied into his work with Les Violons du Roy and La Chapelle de Québec, both of which he founded and continues to lead as music director. With these two ensembles he regularly tours Canada, the US and Europe, in major venues and festivals such as Carnegie Hall, Avery Fisher Hall, Walt Disney Concert Hall, Kennedy Center, The Barbican, The Concertgebouw, and the Salzburg Festival, among others.

Posted: Nov-10-2016
Latest News

Quebec City, January 8, 2016 - Les Violons du Roy founding conductor and La Chapelle de Québec music director Bernard Labadie received the Prix Samuel de Champlain today January 8 in Paris, together with celebrated French pianist Alexandre Tharaud. The award was bestowed by the Ambassador Alfred Siefer-Gaillardin, chair of the France–Canada Institute and Prix Samuel de Champlain jury. Also in attendance were Graeme Clark, chargé d’affaires at the Canadian Embassy, and Michel Robitaille, Quebec’s agent general and the premier’s personal representative for La Francophonie.

For more on the Prix Samuel de Champlain, see prixsamueldechamplain.org (in French).

Posted: Jan-19-2016
Latest Recording

Marc-Andre Hamelin has proven himself - in three highly lauded volumes of Haydn's piano sonatas - to be a formidable Haydn pianist, combining style, exuberance and dazzling technique with a palpable sense of joy in the music. This release is the fruit of a partnership with the award-winning Canadian chamber orchestra Les Violons du Roy and their director Bernard Labadie, whose previous recordings for Virgin Classics and other labels have received the highest critical acclaim. With his scintillating performances of Haydn's three most popular Piano Concertos, Hamelin further demonstrates his special affinity for this repertoire.

Posted: Apr-9-2013
Latest Acclaim

Labadie really knows how to make Haydn’s music come alive. While he gave ample attention to the symphony’s sturm und drang elements, the performance was light on its feet. Despite playing without vibrato and the strings utilizing Baroque bows, this performance was more big-band Haydn than period-infused. The winds really sparkled in the reprise of the first movement’s secondary subject.

— South Florida Classical Review
Posted: Nov-13-2016
Latest Video
Posted: Nov-7-2016